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MICROCOSM 

1977 




MICROCOSM (mi'kro-kos'm) , n. a miniature universe; 
man as typlifying the universe; a district, community, or institu- 
tion regarded as a little world in itself.* 

SIMMONS COLLEGE • BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS • 1977 



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1878 — A view of the marshes where Simmons now stands 



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"FUTURE SHOCK" 



1960 




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The skyscrapers stand proud. 

They seem to say they have sought the absolute 

and make it their own. 
Yet they are blameless, innocent as dumb steel 

and the dumber concrete of their bastions. 
"Man made us," they murmur. 
"We are proud only as man is proud 

and we have no more found the absolute than 

has man." 



Carl Sandburg 






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I have studied many times 

The marble which was chiseled for me — 

A boat with a furled sail at rest in a harbor. 

In truth it pictures not my destination 

But my life. 
For love was offered me and I shrank from its 

disillusionment; 

Sorrow knocked at my door, but I was afraid; 

Ambition called to me, but I dreaded the 

chances. 
Yet all the while I hungered for meaning in 

my life, 

And now I know we must lift the sail, 

And catch the winds of destiny 

Wherever they drive the boat 

To put meaning in one's life may end in 

madness, 

But life without meaning is the torture 

Of restlessness and vague desire — 

It is a boat longing for the sea and yet afraid. 

— Edgar Lee Masters 



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17 



FACULTY 



"I am not a teacher: only a fellow 
traveller of whom you asked the way. i 
pointed ahead — ahead of myself as 
well as of you." 

— Bernard Shaw — 




18 



CHEMISTRY 



James U. Piper, chairperson 

B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

M.S., Ph.D. Emory College 

The roles of the Chemistry Department as 
they relate to the rest of the College are best 
described in terms of the activities of the 
faculty. Our commitment to the preparation 
of professional chemists is based upon our 
own professional activities. For example, Mrs. 
Brauner has recently been Chairman of the 
Northeastern Section of the American 
Chemical Society, Mr. Bell was program 



chairman for a national Chemical Education 
Conference last summer and Mrs. Dey is 
Treasurer of the local Medicinal Chemistry 
Section of the ACS. Students are involved in 
the faculties' research activities during the 
academic year and in the summer. Mr. 
Bowers has applied for National Science 
Foundation funds to support our 
nine-year-old summer research program 
which involved four faculty and seven 
students last summer. 

Our activities involve many students other 
than our concentrators. Mr. Bell's recent 
success in obtaining two National Science 
Foundation grants to develop new teaching 
tools in the sciences is already benefiting 
students in introductory courses through 
increased utilization of audio-visual 
materials. The popular Computer 
Appreciation course developed by Mr. 
Soltzberg provides students with their first 
exposure to the College's extensive computer 
facilities. Mrs. Hartman's interest in 
environmental problems resulted in the 
development of Chemistry 109, a collegewide 
course on the applications of technology to 
the solution of societal problems. 

Fundamentally, the faculty of the 
department try to get students interested in 
the things we enjoy doing. This generates an 
enthusiasm in the learning process which is 
contagious, and this is our chief contribution 
to the College. 





Jerry A. Bell 



Adrienne S. Dey 




Phyllis A. Brauner 





19 



Peter G. Bowers 



Leonard J. Soltzberg 



Robert Oppenheim 

and 

Thomas Wallace 




20 





Fazal A. Chowdry 



■ 
Robert E. Gronquist 



Dana C. Chandler 



ART & MUSIC 



Thomas J. Wallace, chairperson 

A.B. Brown University 

M.A. Brown University 

B.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design 

The department of art and music of- 
fers a concentration in art history and 
also provides courses in drawing and 
graphics which help fulfill require- 
ments of graphics majors in com- 
munications. The department also has 
a number of joint majors who com- 
bine work in art history and studio 
with work in other fields. In addition 
many students take art courses on an 
elective basis. 

Two concentrations in music are of- 
fered, applied music and music his- 
tory and arrangement between Sim- 
mons and The New England Conser- 
vatory of Music. In music also joint 
concentrations are welcomed. As in 
art, music offers the experience of 
contemporary society. 

The department feels that its impor- 
tance on the institutional level lies in 
the unique power of music and art to 
develop aural and visual intelligence 
and articulateness. In the practical 
sense of becoming as fully human as 
one can, a highly developed visual 
and aural intelligence is crucial. This 
in not simply a matter of aesthetics, 
rather it is a matter of bringing a stu- 
dent into a more highly conscious 
sense of the world of her perceptions 
and thereby making it possible for 
thought to proceed from a richer and 
more coherent sense of experience. 



^■H 




ECONOMICS 




Donald Sherk, chairperson 

The Department of Economics has attempted 
to provide its students with a quality education in 
the field of economics. Moreover it has built up 
within its overall course offerings several 
specialities which are designed to be appropriate 
to our students' future professional/career 
choices, namely mathematical economics, urban 
economics and international economics. In addi- 
tion, our active internship program has added a 
unique dimension to one total program. With the 
growing interest in economics throughout the 
country, together with the variety of new posi- 
tions open to women in various branches of eco- 
nomics, the Department believes it to be well 
situated to help its students take maximum ad- 
vantage of this new environment. 





Harriet G. Tolpin 




21 



Barbara A. Sawtelle 




Robert B. Wallace 



22 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Dorothy F. Williams, chairperson 
B.S. Simmons College 
M.S. Boston University 

The department of Communications 
is an informal department. It is a mi- 
crocosm within a microcosm. The fac- 
ulty and the staff enjoy each other 
and are stimulated by their students. 
Although the department is a sizable 
one, its teachers know their students 
and take the greatest pleasure in 
counseling them and in watching 
them progress. 

While fulfilling the "in depth" re- 
quirements, the students move into 
the larger microcosm of the total 
Simmons community. Here they mesh 
their communications studies with 
those of other academic areas. Under 
the work study plan, too, many stu- 
dents are busy in offices of the Col- 
lege editing newsletters, writing pub- 
lic relations releases, producing tapes 
and films, taking photographs, and 
designing booklets. The faculty mem- 
bers also put their talents to work on 
many communications projects for 
the college. 

The students continue to widen 
their sphere of service to the college 
by volunteering on Janus and Mi- 
crocosm. As staff members of the 
Simmons Review , they are in com- 
munication four times a year with the 





whole college community. 

Of course, when a little "PR" needs 
to be done to promote a campus 
function, they are on hand to design 
posters and promote the event. When 
the Communications students sell ar- 
ticles to the press or when they go 
into the field on internships, they ex- 
tend the Simmons sphere of influence 
into the Greater Boston Community. 

From dawn to dusk the students are 
involved in Simmons' channels of 
communication, and they try mightily 
to help to keep them open so that the 
members of the Simmons Community 
can be in dialogue with each other. 




Virginia 
Bratton 




Reginald Jackson 




Robert F. White 



23 



Alden W. Poole 





BIOLOGY 



Anne E. Coghlan, chairperson 

B.S. Simmons College 

M.Ed. Boston University 

M.S. University of Vermont 

Ph.D. University of Rhode Island 

The Biology Department strives to 
be a working, contributing part of 
Simmons College and not a little 
world in itself. The discipline of biol- 
ogy is concerned with the universe — 
all living organisms and the physical 
environment in which the organisms 
exist. 




24 




•""•?. ""*■ 




Sandra N. Brown 



Elizabeth A. Weiant 





Marylee S. Everett 




Richard P. Nickerson 




Martha 
Berliner 



25 



Miriam S. Schweber 




Byron L. Bowman 



ENGLISH 



There are all sorts of answers to the 
question, "Why study literature?" 
some of them good, some of them 
awful. It seems to me that the answer 
really is, "Because we have to be hu- 
man." I don't know what that means, 
but I suspect one cannot get any very 
real sense of what it is to be human 
without some sense of what it has 



been to be human. And for that, the 
past is all we have, the complex 
record of what man has done with his 
problematic humanity. That record 
exists chiefly in what we call litera- 
ture. I suspect that some form of this 
perception lies at the heart of every- 
thing that goes on in the Simmons 
English department. 



Richard Freedman 



26 




Constance A. Lewis 





Lawrence L. Langer 



George W. Nitchie, chairperson 

B.A. Middlebury College 

M.A. Columbia University 

Ph.D. Columbia University 




J. Douglas Perry 



Nellie Y. McKay 




Pamela S. Bromberg 





William M. Manly 




27 



Charles E. L'Homme 





David G. Gullette 



GOVERNMENT 




Carroll F. Miles, chairperson 

A.B. Seton Hall 

M.A. Catholic University 

M.P.A., Ph.D. Harvard University 

The Department of Government is a 
microcosm of the broader political 
society. It exists in an environment of 
politics, it makes political decisions in 
the broadest sense, its students work 
in the world of politics, think about 
that world and leave here to shape 
that world as citizens or practitioners 
of politics. Some become lawyers, 
some bureaucrats, and all become cit- 
izens. 



Cynthia M. Hamilton 



28 





Roy M. Tollefson 



Robert N. Goldman 



MATHEMATICS 



I | j | r 




David Browder, chairperson 

B.A. Amherst College (1966) 

M.A. University of Oregon (1968) 

Ph.D. University of Oregon (1971) 




William D. Novak 





29 



Daniel F. O'Reilly 



A mathematical object of study can 
be thought of as a microcosm, a small 
world, in which there is logical struc- 
ture and consistency, and which 
might well function as a model of 
some aspect of "reality." Manipulat- 
ing the model (the microcosm) is far 
less cumbersome, or risky, than ma- 
nipulating the real world. To decide 
whether each guest will have a place 



at the table, one need only count the 
guests and count the places rather 
than actually conducting an empirical 
test. 

In addition to its applicability, a 
mathematical microcosm can have its 
own appeal, its own fascination. It can 
seem to continually defy description 
and analysis only to yield to an unex- 
pected inspiration. 




John C. Garberson 



HISTORY 



30 



No area of human concern lies out- 
side the interest of the historian, for 
he is engaged in the admittedly im- 
possible task of recapturing the past, 
the entire past. Accordingly, as part of 
his task, he penetrates the outer skin 
of the microcosm, as it can be di- 
versely iTnderstood — the nation 
state, the voluntary society, the indi- 
vidual. The psyches of nations and of 
single men, the hidden recesses of 
the collective and individual mind, are 
probed for the sources of national 
cohesiveness and individual stability, 
for the basic elements of cultures and 
personalities. To that work the histo- 
rian is no stranger. 

But that is only part of his assign- 
ment. Microcosmic interest is bal- 
anced and complemented by mac- 
rocosmic concerns. Probing inward is 
matched by probing outward. The na- 
tion in its relations with other coun- 
tries and the individual in his interac- 




tion with his fellow men, the total so- 
cial existence of state and person 
command the attention of the histori- 
an. Scrutinizing the charnel house of 
war along with acts of loving charity; 
poetry, novels, symphonies, glorious 
inspirations of the human mind along 
with torture chambers and concentra- 
tion camps; great moments involving 
great figures along with the tedium 
and drabness of the day-to-day exis- 
tence of the largely anonymous; 
scrutinizing, that is to say, the warp 
and woof of history, the craftsman 
has but a single goal, to understand. 

The purpose of the History Depart- 
ment at Simmons College is to trans- 
mit to our students an appreciation of 
the priceless heritage of the past, 
whether derived from microcosm or 
macrocosm, with the aim that they 
understand, and in understanding, 
become more deeply human. 



Henry Halko, chairperson 

B.A. Clark University 

M.A., Ph.D. Brown University 



Leslie Fishbein 




John C. Hunter 




Richard B. Lyman 

.... 




31 



MANAGEMENT 



Bruce W. Warren 




Woodrow W. Baldwin 




Milton L. Shuch, chairperson 

B.S. Hofstra University 

Ph.D. New York University 



Laurence M. Onie 




Each subject area within the Sim- 
mons community represents a micro- 
cosm of a universe, the Department of 
Management is no exception. Within 
our course offerings are the broad 
frameworks for career patterns rang- 
ing from accounting to marketing and 
retailing; and in depth from finance to 
personnel and fashion. 



Philosophically our goal is to pro- 
vide our graduates with a solid over- 
view of the field of management and 
the opportunity to accent a particular 
area of interest. The aforementioned 
being accomplished in congruence 
with a balance of liberal arts work "to 
afford our students to develop both a 
profession and a life style. 




Leo J. Parente 




PHILOSOPHY 



The Philosophy Department en- 
courages students to question and 
demands that they make a connection 
between their studies and the larger 
world. The department offers a variety 
of courses which are directed towards 
this purpose. Students may partici- 
pate in seminars on a specific topic or 
philosopher and/or examine various 
philosophers in a more general ap- 
proach. 

The Philosophy Club provides an 
opportunity for students to come to- 
gether to discuss their concerns, 
ideas, in a more informal way. It also 



serves as the liaison body between 
students and faculty. The department 
sponsors three or four forums each 
semester during which the entire 
Simmons community may learn about 
the issues which are currently being 
debated in philosophy. 

The emphasis of the Philosophy 
department then, is two-fold. Stu- 
dents 1) examine various aspects of 
philosophy, and 2) carry these in- 
sights and questions with them into 
the macrocosms of Simmons and the 
community. 




Carol R. Ochs, chairperson 

B.A., M.A. City College of New York 

Ph.D. Brandeis University 




33 



Catherine Elgin 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



34 



Our small department has all the 
characteristics of a good soap opera 
with certain people being on stage 
more because they are available at 
Simmons College. The part-time ar- 
rangements with outside facilities and 
special instructors add spice to the 
script with variables which are con- 
stantly changing. 

These patterns, places and people 
bring laughter, depression, rage, joy, 
cynicism, pleasure, patience, humor 
and all the other ranges of emotion 
which occur when interacting with a 
large cast. 



Mary H. Staley 





Doris E. Olmstead, chairperson 

B.A. Tufts 

M. Ed. Boston University 



SOCIOLOGY 




Felicia I. Ekejiuba 



» Sfk.1 





Stephen London, chairperson 

B.A. Bowdoin College 

Ph.D. University of Chicago 



35 



Sociology is a discipline that 
attempts to document and explain so- 
cial behavior on individual, group, 
and societal levels of analysis. 

The goal of the department is to as- 
sist students to develop analytical and 
intellectual perspectives which will 
allow them to understand and explain 
the bases and consequences of vari- 
ous forms of social behavior. These 
perspectives should also enable stu- 
dents to acquire insight and under- 
standing about their own social be- 
havior and social environment. 

The department's goal is achieved 
through three interrelated areas: 
theory, methodology, and compara- 
tive study. 

In addition to following our formal 



curriculum and subscribing to the col- 
lege's commitment to field experienc- 
es, the department also provides vari- 
ous learning experiences that sup- 
plement the course offerings. Such 
extra-curricular activities as seminars, 
lectures, field trips, and symposia 
provide meaningful educational expe- 
riences for our concentrators and the 
college community. A particularly 
significant contribution has been our 
Social Issues Lecture Series. Through 
this series we have invited a number 
of outside speakers to the college 
who have stimulated us to examine 
social problems we ordinarily would 
not have examined, or to examine 
them in a manner we ordinarily would 
not have considered. 




Elaine C. Hagopian 



AFRO- AMERICAN STUDIES 



36 



Afro-American Studies is a 
legitimate and long overdue 
intellectual enterprise. It provides a 
systematic approach to the study of 
the various social, cultural, and 
historical forces that gave rise to the 
particular structure of the 
Afro-American lifestyle. It offers a 
unique vantage point from which to 
examine a large and important 
cultural group in the United States 
comprised of people who, despite 
great diversity, share a history and a 
culture different in a number of 
important respects from the rest of 
the population. The intellectual study 
of the Afro-American culture is 
sufficiently different and rich to span 
a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary 
approach which provides the 
opportunity to break down the often 
artificial barriers between established 
disciplines and cultures. 

It is impossible to prepare for the 
complex urban environment and the 



world of interracial reality without 
understanding the position of black 
people in this society and the world. 
Education should be a process of 
coming to know one's self and having 
the ability to understand and cope 
with one's environs. Without 
exposure to the Afro-American 
experience, black students cannot 
learn about themselves, and white 
students cannot learn to live with 
people unlike themselves. 

Afro-American Studies corrects the 
omissions and myths of the past; 
provides a way for human beings to 
know themselves and to know each 
other; creates a well-rounded 
intellectual environment in which 
different perspectives can be 
understood and appreciated; and 
seeks to develop sensitive leaders, 
scholars, and informed citizens who 
will work to implement constructive 
social change. 



Marva G. Carter, chairperson 

Boston Conservatory 

N.E. Conservatory 

Boston University 




PHYSICAL THERAPY 





Linda Fetters, chairperson 

B.S. University of Wisconsin 

M.S. Boston University 

Microcosms must relate in order for 
the world to function as a unified 
species toward common goals. Rela- 
tionships between groups are facili- 
tated by people who embrace social 
responsibility. Physcial Therapy is a 
microcosm of individuals with a de- 
sire to embrace the responsibilities of 
serving their fellow persons by joining 
with other microcosms within and 
outside of the medical community to 
provide a wide scope of preventative, 
restorative and supportive care to 
people. The physical therapy student 
at Simmons College is dedicated to 
helping others and sees this help 
being facilitated by the joining of mi- 
crocosms. 



PHYSICS 




Michael Rice 



Edward Prenowitz, chairperson 

B.A. Swarthmore College 

M.A. Harvard University 




37 




Physics tries to discover the pattern 
of events which controls the 
phenomena we observe. But we can 
never know what this pattern means 
or how it originates; and even if some 
superior intelligence were to tell us, 
we should find the explanation unin- 
telligible. 

Sir James Hopwood Jeans 1877-1946 



Robert C. Vernon 



NURSING 



Phyllis S. Moore, chairperson 
B.S. University of Michigan 
M.S., D.N.Sc. Boston University 



38 




Jane D. Gardner 
Mary B. Gardner 





Alice M. Hosack 



The Department of Nursing is not a 
distinct universe, apart from the total 
college. If anything, it continually re- 
flects the college's philosophy in its 
committment to the education of 
women. Uniqueness exists in its ap- 
proach to the preparation of women 
for the professional nursing role 
through a balance of professional ed- 
ucation and liberal education. The 
Department of Nursing's committ- 
ment, like that of the college, is the 
preparation of women who will fulfill 
their lives through thoughtful concern 
for others, sensitivity and creativity in 
their approach to work, an apprecia- 
tion for what is common to all and yet 
unique to each individual, and an in- 
terest in learning as an on-going pro- 
cess. As part of Simmons College, the 
faculty, through interaction in the 
teaching-learning process, also hopes 
to inspire in its students self- 
confidence, independence and a 
committment to society. 




WKB 



Helen C. McLaughlin 




Lois E. Schoppee 




Rosemary Czaplinski 
Maria N. Bueche 









N^sc* 




Ann E. Lord 



39 






Lynn S. Fox 



Jane Krywinski 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Psychology is a window on the 
human world, one that takes man as 
its central subject picking up where 
physics, philosophy and biology leave 
off. It is thus a synthesizing discipline 
and brings its diverse methods and 
traditions to bear on the analysis of 
varieties of human experience. It as- 
pires to be a science in its methods 
and yet to thereby shed some general 
light on the human condition. At 
Simmons the makeup and offerings of 
our department reflect in microcosm 
the scope of the field and diversity of 
opinion it contains. As a result, Sim- 
mons Psychologists rub shoulders 
congenially not only with each other 
but with colleagues in other discip- 



lines. We depend on their support and 
expertise and can claim to intellectu- 
ally join many of the divisions that the 
organized pursuit of knowledge has 
come to contain. And for our students 
we aspire to inspire a similar breadth 
and catholicity of outlook, technique 
and appreciation such that their own 
endeavors both at Simmons and be- 
yond will include a sense of whole- 
ness and depth. For the study of Psy- 
chology, done at least with our Sim- 
mons flair, should create an informed 
sense of tolerance out of the expo- 
sure to genuine diversity. Is this not 
the American dream? So we feel that 
at Simmons we are a microcosm in- 
deed! 



40 




Lillian M. Grayson 



Diane Coulopoulos, chairperson 





. . .' til! 
Mark A. Fridovich 



Peter W. Castle 



Donald W. Thomas 




Barbara F. Gentile 





A 



41 



m. 



Teresa S. Carterette 




EDUCATION 



42 



The Education Department has al- 
most indistinguishable boundaries, 
and thus is less of a microcosm in it- 
self than a part of the larger world 
which itself is the microcosm within 
which education takes place. The de- 
partment has a number of programs: 
human services, elementary and early 
childhood education. Many students 
are double concentrators, many 
spend a great deal of time in public 
schools. As a career field, the de- 
partment helps the student prepare 
for work in the large microcosm that 
lies beyond commencement. 

John S. Robinson, chairperson. 

B.A. Brown University 

Ph.D. Harvard University 




Georgia T. Noble 





Kathleen D. Lyman 



Joel S. Weinberg 





if 




Diane E. Antczak 





43 



Lydia A. Smith 



Joan C. Pine 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
& LITERATURES 




44 



James L.V. Newman, chairperson. 
A.B., M.A. Middlebury College 




Susan M. Keane 



What is a language department? It's 
students and faculty working to- 
gether, learning to master and use 
another language, another idiom, 
another way of thinking. It's a student 
giving another dimension to her edu- 
cation and to her life, opening new 
horizons intellectually, socially, and 
professionally by learning the lan- 
guage, literature, culture, and tradi- 
tions of another people. 

Much of this happens in the clas- 
sroom, of course. But it also happens 
in a faculty office or seminar room, in 
the language laboratory and library, 
through independent study and field 
work in the community, and by study- 
ing abroad. Foreign language con- 
centrators at Simmons are strongly 
encouraged to spend at least a se- 
mester abroad, either at one of the 
centers of our affiliate, the Institute of 
European Studies, located in Eng- 
land, France, Spain, Austria, and 
Germany, or at many other recog- 
nized programs in both the eastern 
and western hemispheres. 

In many fields the ability to speak 
and write a foreign language can give 
you that telling edge that makes you 
more employable and, more impor- 
tantly, can add another dimension to 
your qualifications which might prove 
invaluable for growth and advance- 
ment in your chosen career. 




Gerard R. Montbertrand 



Mary Jane Treacy 



Raquel H. Ferguson 







45 



Helen Mamikonian 



Charles R. Mackey 



NUTRITION 




46 



Patricia K. White, chairperson. 

B.A. Merrimack College 

Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 



Nothing is more universal to indi- 
viduals than their food. Food provides 
not only the nutrients needed for 
health and well-being, but also a 
means for social and cultural inter- 
change. The interaction of the natural 
and social sciences makes the stu- 
dents of the Nutrition Department 
part-time citizens of a microcosm, 
which is merely a reflection of the 
macrocosm. 

Examination of social issues, the 
realities of consumer economics and 
the development of communication 
skills enable our students to bring the 
classroom to neighborhoods, schools 
and clinics. These disciplines are in- 
tertwined with the methods of inquiry 
of biology and chemistry to educate 
young women who are both informed 

Katherine M. Bevacqua 




and informative as members of the 
"outside world." 

Exposure to the macrocosm is pro- 
vided within our microcosm; course 
work, independent study and field 
work projects provide the structure by 
which our students are introduced to 
the interactions and responsibilities 
between the microcosm of our aca- 
demic world and the larger and more 
diverse community. 

The dimensions of the outside 
world are telescoped into educational 
experiences which permit our stu- 
dents to promote health and better liv- 
ing through individual or group coun- 
selling, research, the media and edu- 
cation. 

We hope that we are more than "a 
little world in itself." 

Rena A. Mendelson 




FACULTY NOT AVAILABLE FOR PICTURES 



Mae L. Beck 
Richard B. Carpenter 
Charlene F. Clinton 
Louise G. Cohen 
Dorothy L. Denniston 
Elaine H. Dunn 
Jane Faraday 
Iclal S. Hartman 
Nancie Herbold 
Martha Krow-Lucal 



Eric Lustig 
Marion Mason 
Don H. McKeen 
Margaret S. Menzin 
Ynhui Park 
David S. Perry 
Margaret M. Plymire 
Mark I. Solomon 
Richard C. Sterne 
Everett L. Tuttle 



SENIORS 




47 




LESLIE AHEARN 



48 




JODI ALDERSON 




PAULA ANDERSON 



MARSHA AJHAR 




HOLLY SOULE ANDERSON 






DIANE ARMSTRONG 




YVETTE ARRINDELL 



49 



SUE ANDREWS 



STEPHANIE ARONS 



JANE ANTHONY 






DEBORAH AUTUORI 



50 





7\ 

SUSAN BALASNY 



BARBARA BARRESI 




JOANNE BABITT 



ANGELA BARDAWIL 






MELISSA BAUGHMAN 



ILENE BELINSKY 






PATRICIA BIELER 



REBECCA BERNSTEIN 



51 







PATRICIA BERGSTROM 



NANCY BERTOZZI 




CYNTHIA BIENVENUE 




LAURETTA BILLINGSLEY 





DIANE BISHOP 



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SIMMONS COLLEGE — PREPARING TODAY'S WOMEN FOR 
TOMORROW'S WORLD??? 



CONFESSIONS OF A FEMINIST 



by Jayne Triber, Class of 1977 



It all started out innocently enough. At the age of five a 
marked preference for guns and trucks over dolls and tea 
sets. A fondness for patched jeans and tee shirts and an av- 
ersion to frilly dresses. 

"Don't worry about her. It's a classic case of tomboyish- 
ness. She'll outgrow it," said the wise family physician as he 
tried to reassure the parents. 

But the symptoms persisted and worsened. The disease 
progressed from incipient tomboyishness to blatant mascu- 
linity. You begin to develop masculine characteristics — ag- 
gressiveness, confidence, and pronounced athletic ability. 

"Where have we gone wrong?" said Mother as she wrung 
her dish pan hands. "We've raised the best damn first base- 
man in the neighborhood." 

By the time you entered grade school, you knew you 
would never fit into this masculine/feminine world. Boys car- 
ried milk cartons; girls clapped erasers. Dick climbed trees; 
Jane watched Dick climb trees. Every chore, childhood game 
and story, and even the way children carried their school- 
books was clearly marked masculine or feminine. And no- 
body was allowed to cross over the sexual boundary. 

Junior high school and its partner, puberty, brought more 
changes. Little girls turned in their shoulder pads for training 
bras (What were they training for?). Little boys stuck their 
hands, instead of frogs, down little girls' dresses. 

"Boys don't like smart girls," said Sally who batted her 
eyelashes and was the only girl in seventh grade who had 
anything to put in her training bra. 

High school was even worse. Teachers and guidance 
counselors prepared you for you place in the world. Boys 
became mathematicians; girls became math teachers. Boys 
became President; girls became First Lady. 

"Your grades in English and creative writing are excel- 
lent," said the guidance counselor. "You should become an 
English teacher." 

"But I want to write for the Washington Post." 

"A reporter? You don't want to work with a bunch of 
foul-mouthed, cigar-smoking drunks. Be a teacher. It's a 
marvelous profession for a woman." 

Finally high school was over, and it was off to college. 
There your life began to take on new meaning. Blacks, 
Chicanos, gays, and women were struggling against oppres- 
sion. Everyone was raising his or her consciousness. You 
weren't quite sure what your consciousness was, but you 
raised it anyway. There were others out there like you. And 
you had a name — feminists. 

"A feminist! Why can't you be a communist like other col- 
lege kids?" cried Mother as she pressed the puree button on 
the blender. 



It wasn't so bad when your Aunt Agnes of the waiter in the 
cafeteria asked the questions, but when they came from 
people whom you thought were well-educated, socially 
aware, and liberal, you began to wonder if there was some- 
thing wrong with you. In desperation, you visited a psychia- 
trist. 

"Your problem is a textbook case of poor feminine iden- 
tification." 

"How do you define 'feminine'?" 

"Womanly. Soft and gentle. You're not fulfilling the 
feminine role." 

"Why do I have to play a role? I'm not an actress. I'm a 
person." 

"Now you're getting aggressive. This is masculine be- 
havior. I'd wager you had a passive mother and a domineer- 
ing father who was overconfident in his masculinity. You un- 
doubtedly suffer from a subconscious feeling of pe — " 

"Say 'penis envy' and I'll deck you." 

You knew now it wasn't you who was sick. It was all the 
Aunt Agneses and waiters and parents and psychiatrists who 
were so unsure of themselves that they had to rely on labels 
to tell them who they were. You knew who you were. 

That old masculine confidence of your youth bounced 
back. When you found out your boss paid you less than the 
man who held the job before you, you brought him to court, 
and won. You asked that good-looking man in the sales de- 
partment to lunch, instead of waiting for him to ask you. 

The battle is often uphill. Aunt Agnes says you'll get these 
foolish ideas out of your head when you find a nice young 
man and settle down. The psychiatrist is sure you'll recover if 
you find a feminine role model to identify with. And mother, 
with her blender and her dishpan hands, is quite baffled by 
the whole situation. 

"Mom, I've joined NOW." 

"I'm so glad you're getting involved in a club, dear. What is 
it that you've joined now?" 

"I don't think you understand, Mom I've joined NOW, the 
National Organization for Women." 

"How are you going to meet a man if you join a women's 
club, dear?" 

In the face of all this adversity, you're still optimistic about 
your future as a woman and a feminist. 

Now you walk down the street with your head held high 
and the latest issue of Ms. tucked securely under your arm. 
And the next time you walk by the construction site and that 
curly-haired construction worker gives you the once-over, 
you're going to walk over and give him a wink and a pat on 
the rump. That should raise his consciousness, don't you 
think? 



ADMINISTRATION 




105 



ADMINISTRATION 



106 




President William Holmes 



Walter E. Steere, Jr. 
Business Manager 






Priscilla McKee 
Assistant to the President 



Ethel M. Bere 
Assistant Treasurer, Comptroller 



DEAN 



Charlotte M. Morocco 

B.S. Shippensburg State College 

M.Ed. Ohio University 

I'm sitting at my desk; it's 7:30 p.m., 
December 8, 1976; and I'm tired. 

That opening statement is not de- 
signed to elicit sympathy. It is simply 
an expression of an emotion which 
typifies the feelings of just about 
everyone at Simmons at this time of 
year. It is a way of saying that the 
Deans' Offices and therefore the peo- 
ple who work here are indeed a mic- 
rocosm of our larger Simmons Com- 
munity. 

The activities of our offices are for 
the most part a reflection of the 
needs, hopes, frustrations, and joys of 
our Community, particularly of you, 
our students. We travel together 
through orientation, registration, 
course selection, decisions to transfer 
or to withdraw, experimentation, fai- 
lure, success, and finally to gradua- 
tion. Through that journey we laugh 
with you, cry with you, prod you, ad- 
vise you, get angry with you, grow 
with you, and finally applaud your 



success. 

Our primary objective is to see that 
each of you is able to achieve your 
maximum potintial both academically 
and personally. We interact with fac- 
ulty, other administrators, staff and 
maintenance personnel, outside pro- 
fessionals, alumnae and parents to 
achieve that objective. 

We consider ourselves successful 
only when we can answer the follow- 
ing questions in the affirmative. Are 
we graduating competent, self- 
condident, mature women? Do our 
graduates believe in themselves and 
do they have an understanding of and 
belief in the human rights and dignity 
of others? Do they understand that 
education is a life-long process that 
does not end at Commencement? 
Have we provided them with the best 
possible faculty, curriculum, and 
learning environment? 

The Deans' Offices, like Simmons 
itself, is a microcosm of our larger 
community. It is the richness and the 
potentialities of those communities 
that encourages me to write this 
statement when .... I'm tired. 




"'■■>***M*«mmiMillHjiim^^^:,. 
' ' ' T IM Mniji 



107 



Betty Rawlins 
Associate Dean 



M. Don Sargent 
Treasurer 



Paul R. Miller 
Public Affairs 




<^£| 






Sherwood A. Barrow 
Registrar 



Mary Jane Doherty 
Director of Alumnae Affairs 





Caroline H. Pooler 
Continuing Education 



108 



Jane C. Halko 
Director of Admissions 






Jonathan Ehrenworth 
Counseling Center 



Bernice Poutas 
Director of Development 



i 






Nancy C. Stoll 
Head of Residence 



Margaret A. Loeb 
Public Information 





Dorothy Senghaus 
Director of the Library 



Geri M. Hura 
Director of Student Activities 





109 



Joan Carroll 
Placement Office 



Dr. Marjorie Readdy 
Health Center 




Scott Fader 
Plant Superintendent 





Helen B. Moore 
Supportive Instructional Services 



110 




F. Ann Shaw 
Director of Student Employment 



Patricia Keegan 
Director of Financial Aid 





Scott Montgomery 
Manager of Simmons Bookstore 




111 




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the medium is . . . 





the MASSAGE 



140 












141 




Have you ever felt like climbing the walls? 



"MAD DAWGS AND P.T. STUDENTS" 



142 





STATION 3: 
If you have not 
collected 16 credits — 
STOP! DO NOT PASS GO. 
Return to STATION 1 
and start all over again . 




friends we will 
remember you, 
think of you, 
pray for you, 
and when another 
day is through 
we'll still be 
friends with you. 
— John Denver — 



143 



DIRECTORY 



OLUSOLA A. ADEDEJI 

Nutrition 

E17 JKE-Esho St. 

Ilesha, Nigeria 



JANE H. ANTHONY 

Biology 

7 Westwood Rd. 

Andover, Ma. 01810 



SUSAN L. BALASNY 
Government 
20 Mahan St. 
Tenefly, N.J. 07670 



FLORENCE A. ADEJUWON 
Medical Technology 
13 Akinda St. Ibulci 
Ikorodu rd Lagos, Nigeria 



DIANE ARMSTRON 
Communications, Advertising 
107 Pond St. 
South Weymouth, Ma. 02190 



MARCY L BALTIMORE 
Elementary Education 
7 McDonnell Drive 
Randolph, Ma. 02368 



LESLIE AHEARN 
Physical Therapy 
41 Clay Spring Rd. 
Cohasset, Ma. 02025 



ELLEN ARMSTRONG 

Nutrition 

85 Pine Grove St. 

Needham, Ma. 02194 



STEPHANIE A. BANKS 

Government 

225 Virginia Ave #2a 

San Mateo, Ca 94201 



144 



MARSHA G. AJHAR 
English, Government 
11 Brentwood Ave. 
Easton, Pa. 18042 



JACQUELINE ALDERSON 
Management 
8005 Kerry Lane 
Chevy Chase, Md. 



STEPHANIE E. ARONS 

Art 

40 Valley Circle 

Fairfield, Ct. 06604 



YVETTE ARRINDEL 
American Studies 
827 Ashford St. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11207 



ANGELA BARDAWIL 
Spanish 

Devonshire Drive 
Omaha, Nb. 68114 



BARBARA BARRESI 
Physical Therapy 
5 West Main St. 
Fort Kent, Me. 04743 



NANCY E. ALLINSON 
70 El mg rove Ave. 
Providence, R.I. 02906 



DEBORAH AUTORI 
Communications, Advertising 
11 Pinehurst St. 
Trumbull, Ct. 06611 



MELISSA BAUGHMAN 

Nursing 

262 Hi Merest Rd. 

Needham, Ma. 02192 



PAULA STADOLNIK ANDERSON 
Education-early childhood, Spanish 
68 Tremont St. 
Maiden, Ma. 02148 



ELAINE BABCOCK 
Economics, Government 
16 Allston St. 
Allston, Ma. 02134 



CYNTHIA BEAL 

Physical Therapy 

Box 271 

North Falmouth, Ma. 02556 



SUSAN G. ANDREWS 

Nursing 

8 High Range Rd. 

Londonderry, N.H. 03053 



JOANNE BABITT 

Elementary Education-Special ed 

184 Holmes Dale 

Albany, N.Y. 12208 



ILENE BELINSKY 
Government, Finance 
37 Rockland Drive 
Brockton, Ma. 02401 



LORI BENDETT 

Nursing 

109 Highwood Rd. 

West Hartford, Ct. 



PATRICIA BERGSTROM 

Math 

182 Graham St. 

Gardner, Ma. 01440 



REBECCA BERNSTEIN 

English 

330 Long Pond Drive 

South Yarmouth, Ma. 03664 



NANCY B. BERTOZZI 
Physical Therapy 
190 Littlefield St. 
Pautucket, R.I. 02561 



PATRICIA A. BIELER 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
Psychology 
181 Cedar St. 
Arlington, Ma. 02174 



CYNTHIA L. BIENVENUE 

Nursing 

11 E. Main St. 

Webster, Ma. 01570 



LAURA ETTA BILLINGSLEY 
Management, Advertising 
52 South St. 
Framingham, Ma. 01701 



DIANE BISHOP 
Communications, Advertising 



28 Cross St. 
Dover, Ma. 02030 

JEAN A. BLAKE 
Nursing, Biology 
67 Haverhill Rd. 
Trumbull, Ct. 06611 

SUSAN BLAKE 
Management, French 
71 Moraine St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 02130 



BARBARA J. BLANCHETTE 

Nursing 

402 Whitlow St. 

New Bedford, Ma. 02746 



CHERYL E. BLATT 
Psychology, Education-special 
7 Manor Drive 
Stoughton, Ma. 02072 

MARGARET BLEIFELD 
Physical Therapy 
56-23- 219 St. 
Bayside, N.Y. 11364 



ESTHER BLINDERMAN 
4935 Glenmeadow 
Houston, Tx. 77035 



RUTH E. BOGHOSIAN 
Management 
10 Green Lane 
Lexington, Ma. 02173 



JOAN BOROWITZ 
Communications 



2561 Coventry Rd. 
Shaker Heights, Oh. 44120 



CANDACE L. BOWS 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
18 Edison St. 
Oberlin, Oh. 



MICHELLE BOYES 
Physical Therapy 
1330 Highland Ave. 
Plainsfield, N.J. 07060 



ELLEN BRAV 

Management, Communications, 

Advertising 

265 Payson Rd. 

Belmont, Ma. 02178 



ELENA T. BREEN 

Nursing 

105 Francis Wyman Rd. 

Burlington, Ma. 01803 



ELLEN BRESSLER 
Math, Psychology 
38 Glen St. apt. 2 
Somerville, Ma. 01803 



GAYLE A. BRIDGMAN 
Management, Finance 
42 Princeton Drive 
New Providence, N.J. 



ELIZABETH R. BRUCE 
Education-early childhood 
33A Frost Creek Drive 
Locust Valley, N.Y. 11560 



145 



GAYLE A. BRIDGMAN 
Management, Finance 
42 Princeton Drive 
New Providence, N.J. 



ANN L. BYRON 

Nursing 

64 Bedford St. 

Woburn, Ma. 01801 



BETH E. CEDERBERG 
Education-early childhood 
25 Town House Rd. 
Attleboro, Ma. 02703 



ELIZABETH R. BRUCE 
Education-early childhood 
33A Frost Creek Drive 
Locust Valley, N.Y. 11560 



SALLY CALCAGNI 
Management, Finance 
7 Upland Drive 
Rutland, Vt. 05701 



LORRIE L CELOZZI 
English, Government 
66 Blueberry Lane 
Avon, Ct. 06001 



ELLEN R. BUCHBINDER 
Management 
1550 Worcester Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 01701 



CAROLYN M. CANAVAN 
Psychology 
321 Adams St. 
Milton, Ma. 02186 



EVA S.W. CHAN 
Communications, Advertising, 
Graphics 
95 Centre St. 
Brookline, Ma. 02146 



146 



NORMA BUCKHAULTER 
Management 
200 Delphi St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 02126 



SUSAN L. BURNETT 
English, Education-special ed. 
25 Sarah St. 
Burlington, Ma. 01803 



ANN C. BURNHAM 

Box 141 

Hopedale, Ma. 01757 



KATHRYN BURNS 
Psychology 
68 College St. 
Clinton, N.Y. 13323 



MARIE T. BUSHFAN 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
890 Roxbury St. 
Roxbury, Ma. 02119 



MARY CANTELMO 

Nursing 

1021 Union St. 

Rockland, Ma. 02370 



PAULA G. CARLSON 
Math, Management 
15 Lawrence St. 
Boylston, Ma. 01583 



ALEXANDRA J. CARR 
Communications 
26 Jamaicaway 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 02130 



PATRICIA CARUSO 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
14 Garfield Rd. 
Melrose, Ma. 02176 



JUDITH A. CAULMARE 
Economics, Management 
114 Klondike Ave. 
Fitchburg, Ma. 01420 



AILENE CHANG 

Economics 

1010 Mamiana Mansion 

44 Mamiana Cho Min Ro 

Tokyo, Japan 



DIANE CHARTIER 

Nursing 

732 Country St. 

New Bedford, Ma. 02740 



MARY L CHRISTIE 

Nutrition 

9 Welland Circle 

Weymouth, Ma. 02188 



CHERYL CHRISTMAS 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
4 Manomet Rd. 
N. Weymouth, Ma. 02191 



KIM L. CLARK 
Psychology 



71 Olney St. 
Providence, R. 



02906 



SHARON COHEN 

Psychology 

11 Collidge Ave. 

Concord, N.H. 03301 



CATHERINE CONGELOSI 

History 

#2 Riley Rd. 

Newburgh, N.Y. 12550 



MARIE CONLON 

Nutrition 

16 Fairmont St. 

Cambridge, Ma. 02139 



BARBARA J. CONTARINO 
50 River St. 
Andover, Ma. 01810 



DUDLEY M. COOK 
Stafford St. 
Charlton, Ma. 01507 



LISA W. COOPER 

Nutrition 

68 Edgemere Rd. 

Quincy, Ma. 02169 

ANDREA L. COOPERSTEIN 
Psychology 
40 Woodfall Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 02178 



MONICA WOLLMAR COPP 
Nursing 



Woods End Rd. 
Lincoln, Ma. 01773 



NANCY ELLEN COPPOLA 

Communications 

46 Commonwealth Ave. 

Boston, Ma. 02116 



PATRICIA A. CORKUM 
21 Avalon Rd. 
Stoneham, Ma. 02180 



SUSAN H. CORLEY 
Communications, French 
110 Abnaki Ave. 
Essex Junction, Vt. 05452 



NADINE CRUZ 

Elementary Education, Psychology 

1 Florence St. 

New Bedford, Ma. 02740 



LESLIE DEAR 

Communications, Advertising 
8 Overhill Rd. 
South Orange, N.J. 07079 



MARY G. DELLA PENNA 
Physical Therapy 
90 Tyndale St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 02131 



KAREN DENUZZE 

Nursing 

56 Westwood Drive 

New Britain, Ct. 06052 



KATHY A. DESANTI 
217 Prentice St. 
Springfield, Ma. 01104 



DONNA M. DILEO 

Nutrition 

8 Harding Ave. 

Braintree, Ma. 02184 



DENISE Dl NOVI 

Open, Education-special ed. 

158 Scarborough St. 

Toronto, Ontario Canada M4E3H2 



JULIE M. DICKERSON 
51 E. Springfield St. 
Boston, Ma. 02118 



DAWN M. DICKINSON 

Nursing 

193 Wilton Rd. West 

Ridgefield, Ct. 06877 



JOANNE DIMITRIOU 
Chemistry 
7 River St. #1 
Arlington, Ma. 02174 



LESLIE M. HILL-DOLAN 

Philosophy 

Rear 133 Old Ocean St. 

Marshfield, Ma. 



ELIZABETH A. DORAN 
Management, Nutrition 
5 Lawndale Rd. 
Stoneham, Ma. 02180 



147 



ANNE E. DOUGLAS 
Chemistry, Management 
106 Lengue Vue Drive 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15228 



DEBORAH J. DUSKIN 

Nutrition 

649 Belmont St. 

Manchester, N.H. 03104 



DIANE FARLEY 

Nursing 

2c Ralph Rd. 

Manchester, Ct. 06040 



ELIZABETH W. DOWLING 

Management 

20 Joanne Drive Apt. 29 

Ashland, Ma. 01730 



PAULETTE DUSSOSSOIT 
Art, Philosophy 
51 Jerusalem Drive 
Cohasset, Ma. 02025 



SHELLEY FARNHAM 
Management 
12127 Forest Hills Cr. 
Tampa, Fl. 3612 



JOYCE DRACOFF 

Math, Finance 

9 Glazer Rd. 

Newton Centre, Ma. 02159 



JOANNE EASTON 

Management 

99 Wellington Ave. 

Short Hills, N.J. 07078 



MAUREEN C. FAY 
Biology, Chemistry 
29 Aldworth St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 02130 



148 



DONNA DRESSLER 
History, Communications 
18 Brian Hill Rd. 
Norwich, Ct. 06360 



GAIL V. DREYFUS 
11 Woodcliff Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 02167 



GERALDINE DUFFY 
Psychology, Elementary 
Education-special ed. 
33 Ferry Rd. 
Newburyport, Ma. 01950 



BONNIE J. EDWARDS 

Nursing 

121 Tremont St. Apt. 4 

Brighton, Ma. 02135 



TANYA EFRUS 
Sociology, Biology 
35 Boulevard Terrace 
Allston, Ma. 02134 



ANNE D. ELLIOT 

English, French 

46 Myrtle St. 

West Newton, Ma. 02165 



ELAINE B. FELDBERG 

English 

19 Brighton Ave. 

Brighton, Ma. 02135 



PATRYZIA T. FENNELL 
French 



KATHLEEN J. FENTON 

Nursing 

83 Ashland St. 

Taunton, Ma. 02788 



NOEL C. DUFFY 
Physical Therapy 
20 Brown St. 
Palmer, Ma. 01069 



NANCY L. ELLSBREE 

Psychology 

499 Washington St. 

Brighton, Ma. 02135 



MARCIA FINGERMAN 
Spanish, Education-special 
302 Lawrence Rd. 
Medford, M. 02155 



ELAINE M. DUNHAM 

Nursing 

122 Chestnut St. 

Waltham, Ma. 02154 



DIANNE B. ENGELL 
Biology, Psychology 
L5 Edgemont Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 02135 



SUSAN E. FIRESTONE 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
12 Barnum Ave. 
Plainview, N.Y. 11803 



LYNN FISCHOFF 
Communications, Art 
162 Woodlawn Ave. 
New Rochelle, N.Y. 10804 



LEANNE M. GEORGE 

Communications, Art 

RFD 

Concord, Vt. 05824 



EILEEN M. GOGUEN 
English, Education-special ed. 
33 Garfield St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 02138 



LILLIOM G.E. FISHER 
Psychology 
546 Westley Rd. 
Glencoe, II. 60022 



THEODORE E. GIFFORD 
Government 
26 Virginia Ave. 
Pittsfield, Ma. 01201 



CYNTHIA W. GOLDSTEIN 
Psychology 
Lawrence Academy 
Groton, Ma. 



GAYLE FLAHERTY 
Education, Spanish 
75 Donna Drive 
Hanover, Ma. 02339 



JULIE A. GILLIS 
Management, Math, Economics 
52 Clearwater Drive 
Westwood, Ma. 02090 



GRISELL GOMEZ 
Medical Technology 
1011 Sw215 St. 
Miami, Fl. 33157 



ISABELLE FLOREK 
Physical Therapy 
697 Washington St. 
Dedham, Ma. 02026 



DENISE FOWLER 
Government 
28 North Main St. 
Natick, Ma. 01760 



DEBORAH B. GLASSMAN 

4602 Simon Rd. 

Forest Hills Park, De. 19803 



MARLENE GLAZER 
French, Management 
12 Kiley Drive 
Randolph, Ma. 02368 



PATRICIA M. GOW 

Physical Therapy 

100 Clearwater Rd. 

Newton Lower Falls, Ma. 02162 

KATHLEEN A. GRAHAM 

Nutrition 

312 Portsmouth Ave. 

Seabrook Beach, N.H. 03874 



149 



SANDRA P. FRANKMAN 
Art, Open 

5340 Pard Lane Rd. 
East Lansing, Mi, 48823 



LORI B. FRIEDLAND 

Communications 

15 Woodlawn Rd. 

N. Dartmouth, Ma. 02747 



KAREN GLICK 
38 Ruddock Rd. 
Sudbury, Ma. 01776 



CHRISTINE GLIDDEN 
English 
South Rd. 
Pepperell, Ma. 



BARBARA GRAY 
French, Communications 
15 Clinton Rd. 
Melrose, Ma. 02176 



NINA D. GREENBAUM 
American Studies 
56 Greenwood Ave. 
Swampscott, Ma. 01907 



SARA L. GENS 
56 Barnstable Rd. 
West Newton, Ma. 02165 



PAMELA C. GODFREY 
Management 
47 Linwood St. 
Maiden, Ma. 02148 



FAITH GREENBERG 

Nursing 

1701 Commonwealth Ave. 

W. Newton, Ma. 02165 



DENISE L. GREENE 
6 Newtowne Ct. no. 165 
Cambridge, Ma. 02139 



ALLISON M. GRISWOLD 

Nursing 

75 Fischer Circle 

Portsmouth, R.I. 02871 



ELIZABETH ANN GROEN 
Education 
1105 Park Ave. 
River Forest, II. 60305 



MELANIE GUZELIAN 
Education, Psychology 
21 Mansfield Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 02181 



SHERYL GWYNNE 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
5056 Hampton Drive 
North Olmstead, Oh. 44070 



CYNTHIA HALL 
132 Birch Hill Rd. 
Agawam, Ma. 01001 



ROBIN A. HARRINGTON 
Biology, Chemistry 
76 Promenade St. 
Riverside, R.I. 02915 



PATRICE HARRIS 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
5830 Southern Ave. 
Washington D.C. 20019 



MARTHA HEYWOOD 
English 
85 Elm St. 
Gardner, Ma. 01440 



150 



CAROLYN J. GROSSKURTH 

Nursing 

18 Phillips Ave. 

Middletown, R.I. 02840 



BETH GROSSMAN 
Management 
223 Nowell Rd. 
Bangor, Me. 04401 



ANDREA R. GRUBER 

Math 

23 Erin Rd. 

Stoughton, Ma. 



AMY J. HANDLER 
Physical Therapy 
455 Ridge Rd. 
Middletown, Ct. 06457 



CAROL A. HANKINS 
Biology 
Sewall Rd. 
Bridgetown, N.J. 08305 



DEBBIE HAPP 

Nursing 

2211 Webster Drive 

Schenectady, N.Y. 1209 



LUANN HINTLIAN 
Elementary Education, Art 
7 Wood Lane 
Winchester, Ma. 01890 



SHELLEY A. HOLLIDAY 
Government, Management 
7 May St. #304 
Hartford, Ct. 06105 

DEBORAH HOLMES 

Nursing 

125 Green St. 

Cambridge, Ma. 02139 



JANE L. GUSTAFSON 
Communications 
11 Plymouth Rd. 
Cranston, R.I. 02920 



MARSHA HARDING 
Economics, Government 
8123 Rosewood 
Prairie Village, Kc. 66208 



MARY E. HOWE 
Government 
35 Lake Ave. 
Walpole, Ma. 02081 



SALLY GUYOTT 

1 Ridgewood Terrace 

North Haven, Ct. 06473 



ELIZABETH HARDY 

Nutrition 

20 Damon Rd. 

Scituate, Ma. 02066 



CAROL A. HRYNIEWICZ 

Math 

246 Fairmount Ave. 

Hyde Park, Ma. 02136 



JIN-HSIAO HSU 

Nutrition 

4th FL NJ4 Lane 4CC Anting St. 

Taipei, Taiwan 



LESLIE J. HURVITZ 
Elementary Education-special ed. 
68 McLean St. 
Wellesley, Ma. 02181 



GEORGIA JENSEN 
Psychology, Elementary 
Education-special ed. 
6 Forest Ridge 
Clayton, Md. 63105 



RAMONA C. JOHNSON 
46 Mountfort St. Apt. 24 
Boston, Ma. 02215 



ROBIN L. KAPLAN 

Biology 

628 Westford St. 

Lowell, Ma. 01851 



ELLEN D. KARSH 
Management, Finance 
141 Gordon Rd. 
Waban, Ma. 02168 



GWENDOLYN L. IFILL 
Communications 
146 Thompson St. 
Springfield, Ma. 01109 



MARY M. INSEL 

Psychology 

203 Lake Ave. 

Newton Highlands, Ma. 02161 



NANCY Y. IP 

Chemistry 

8 Mott St. Apt. 3 

New York, N.Y. 10013 



BERYL V. JONES 
803 Magna Carta Drive 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 



MARY ELLEN JOY 

Elementary Education, 

Communications 

533 Riverside Drive 

Morth Tamytown, N.Y. 10591 

LISA B. KALISH 
Psychology, Management 
334 Pepper Ridge Rd. 
Stamford, Ct. 06905 



KATHLEEN M. KELLY 
Physical Therapy 
150 North River Rd. 
Manchester, N.H. 03104 



GAIL KENDALL 
Economics, Open 
20 Burroughs Rd. 
Brockton, Ma. 02401 



ROBIN B. KENNY 
Communications 
Box 270A 
Furlong, Pa. 18925 



151 



DAIVA T. IZBICKAS 

Biology 

20 Old Stone Rd. 

Westwood, Ma. 02090 



DEBRA T. KANER 
Nursing 
154 Erin Rd. 
Stoughton, Ma. 02072 



CHRISTINE KEY 
Biology, Chemistry 
186 N. Clinton St. 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 12601 



MELISSA A. JAD 
Management, Philosophy 
719 Clinton Place 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15202 



BONNIE S. KAPLAN 
Communications 
39 Sunset Drive 
Randolph, Ma. 02368 



KATHLEEN T. KIELY 
Physical Therapy 
15 Ridgebrook Drive 
West Hartford, Ct. 01607 



EVELYN M. JELSTROM 

Nursing 

625 SW 12 St. 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33315 



NANCY F. KAPLAN 

Nutrition 

16 Churchill Rd. 

Tenafly, N.J. 07670 



SUSAN KORBER 

Nursing 

353 Eldridge St. 

Fall River, Ma. 02720 



JANICE KORFF 
Psychology 
159 Truro Lane 
Milton, Ma. 02186 



EILEEN S. KRAMER 
Physical Therapy 
36 Packard Ave. 
Hull, Ma. 02045 



PAULA LEFKOWITZ 
Elementary Education 
6 Daniel Drive 
Glen Cove, NY 11542 



JANET LEHR 

Biology 

5 Childs Road 

Lexington, Ma. 02173 



MARGARET A. MACIAK 
263 Lynn Shore Drive 
Lynn, MA 01902 



MARGARET A. MACKINNON 
Physical Therapy 
7 Terrace Way 
Lincoln, Rl 02865 



SUSANNA H. KREY 

Nutrition 

54 Andover St. 

Wilmington, Ma. 01887 



DEBRA B. LEVIN 

Nursing 

20 Summit Avenue 

Providence, Rl 02906 



PHOEBE MACPHERSON 
English, History 
185 Audubon Drive 
Snyder, NY 14226 



152 



SUSAN LANHAM 
Physical Therapy 
Bennett Hill Rd. 
Rowley, Ma. 01969 



LUCIA LATHAM 

Nursing 

7 Western Ave. 

Essex, Ma. 01929 



JOAN LEVIN 

Nutrition 

17 Berkshire Road 

Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07675 



JUDITH LEVY 

Biology 

96 Trowbridge Street 

Cambridge, Ma. 02138 



BOBBI D. MAGIDOFF 
525 Jorgen Street 
Lawrence, NY 11516 



KANDIS A. MAKI 
Physical Therapy 
70 South Road 
Holden, Ma. 01520 



JANE R. LEBLANC 

Nursing 

77 Cabot Street 

Waltham, Ma. 02154 



ROBERTA G. LOJKO 
Special-Education, English 
8 Janet Center 
North Grafton, Ma. 01536 



DOREEN MALICK 

Nutrition 

7296 Main Street 

Stratford, Ct. 06497 



AMY LEE 

19B Repulse Bay Road 

11th Floor 

Hong Kong 



LORRAINE LOSCO 

Elementary Education, Psychology 

18 Orchard Avenue 

Wakefield, MA 01880 



ELISE MANLEY 
English, Special Education 
33 Clark Road 
Sudbury, Ma. 01776 



SUSAN BOLTON LEE 

Management 

80 West Cedar Street 

Boston, Ma. 02114 



HOPE E. LYNCH 
Psychology, Sociology 
11 Bluefield Terrace 
Mattapan, MA 02126 



PAULA MARCHIONE 
Mathematics, Economics 
26 Langley Road 
Brighton, Ma. 02135 



DEBRA ANN MASON 
Physical Therapy 
101 Western Avenue, Apt. 23 
Cambridge, Ma. 02139 



CANDACE A. MCCRACKEN 

Psychology 

112 Devonshire Road 

Attleboro, Ma. 02703 



EMILY MEI 
Management 
75 Trull Lane 
Lowell, Ma. 01852 



NANCY L. MAURICE 
Art, Public Relations 
672 Main Street 
Haverhill, Ma. 01830 



CAROL A. MCHUGH 

Nursing 

926 South Street 

Dalton, Ma. 01226 



KATHERINE MENDYKOWSKI 
History, Government 
260 South Main Street 
Hopedale, Ma. 01747 



VIRGINIA MAZUR 

Psychology 

13 Ralph Avenue 

Newington, Ct. 06111 



MARCIA A. MCKENNEY 
Management 
17 Arden Road 
Wellesley, Ma. 02181 



CAROL A. MEYER 
Biology, Chemistry 
20 Willow Street 
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028 



ANNE C. MCAULIFFE 
Communications, Graphics 
3 Calumet Lane 
Marblehead, Ma. 01945 



LESLIE MCAULIFFE 
Government, Management 
17 Endicott Street 
Quincy, Ma. 02169 



ELIZABETH A. MCLAUGHLIN 
History, Economics 
435 Canton Avenue 
Milton, Ma. 02187 



MAUREEN L. MCLAUGHLIN 
Physical Therapy 
7 Irving Street 
Danvers, Ma. 01923 



MELANIE MEYER 
89 Highfield Drive 
Torrington, Ct. 06790 



JANICE J. MICHAUD 

Route 1 

Hallowell, Me. 04347 



153 



JANICE E. MCCALLUM 
Economics, French 
88 Hancock Street 
Braintree, Ma. 02184 



MARYELLEN MCNALLY 
23 Evergreen Road 
Sudbury, Ma. 



HOLLY MILARK 
199A Beacon Street 
Somerville, Ma. 02143 



PATRICIA H. MCCARTHY 
Physical Therapy 
98 Sand Hill Road 
Simsbury, Ct. 06070 



DAWN MCOSKER 
Physical Therapy 
519 Curran Road 
Cumberland, Rl 02864 



MARION MILLER 
Physical Therapy 
40 Outlook Drive 
Lexington, Ma. 02173 



JOCELYN MCCLURG 
Communications, English 
322 Stonewall Road 
Catonsville, Md. 21228 



NANCY MCQUEEN 

Nursing 

11 Elm Street 

Harrington Park, NJ 07640 



SUSAN E. MIRANIAN 
Management 
47 Great Road 
Greenwich, Rl 02818 



PATRICE D. MODEEN 
Communications, Public Relations 
29 Stage Coach Road 
Bristol, Ct. 06010 



ROBIN MOTHON 
Physical Therapy 
80 Lynn Street 
Lawrence, Ma. 01843 



VERONICA NG 
Economics, Finance 
57 Westmoreland Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 



MARY L MOLLICA 
Physical Therapy 
28 Adams Street 
Braintree, Ma. 02184 



DEBRA A. MULLEY 

Nursing 

24 Howe Street 

Ipswich, Ma. 01938 



JAN NISBET 
Physical Therapy 
Box 110 
Orris Island, Me. 



CAROL P. MOLNICK 
Biology, Chemistry 
1324 Mid wood Place 
Silver Spring, Md. 20910 



JANET E. MUMFORD 
Physical Therapy 
25 Linden Avenue 
Cumberland, Rl 02864 



IFEYINWA U. ODUNUKWE 
Math, Management 
Box 17 
Nnewi Ecs, Nigeria 



154 



DEBORAH A. MORESCHI 
14 Townsend Street 
Roxbury, Ma. 



WENDY J. MORRISON 
Communications, Public Relations 
7436 Gambols Lane 
Norfolk, Va. 23505 



KAREN A. MUMPER 

Nursing 

44 Evelyn Road 

Needham, Ma. 02194 



CINDY MURVAY 
Physical Therapy, Art 
20655 Corinth Road 
Olympia Fields, II. 60461 



MARY ELLEN M. OLDFIELD 
Philosophy, Psychology 
41385 Oberlin Road 
Elyria, Ohio 44035 



KRISTIN I. OLSON 
1101 North Payn 
Beaumont, Ca. 92223 



MARYELLEN MORRISSEY 

Nursing 

80 Woodcliff Road 

Quincy, Ma. 02169 



SUSAN NAST 

Nursing 

20 Ridge Brook Road 

Greenwich, Ct. 06830 



CATHERINE M. OTTAVIANO 
Communications 
4 Edwards Road 
Johnston, Rl 02919 



LANI E. MORTON 
Communications, Public Relations 
59 Massasoit Street 
Northampton, Ma. 01060 



PATRICIA H. NEALON 
English, Communications 
68 Edgewater Road 
Hull, Ma. 02045 



AGNES D. OYIBOKJA 
Economics, Finance 
30 Iroquois Street 
Boston, Ma. 02120 



ANNE C. MOSTERTZ 
76 Freeman Parkway 
Providence, Rl 02906 



MARSHA F. NEIL 

Nursing 

151 Stanwood Street 

Boston, Ma. 02121 



MARY E. PANDA 
Physical Therapy 
297 Broadway 
Chicopee, Ma. 01020 



EKATERINI PAPAGIANNOPOULOS 
22 Creighton Street 
Cambridge, Ma. 02140 



SHARON PASLEY 
74 Elm Hill Avenue 
Boston, Ma. 02121 



ARLENE PATTERSON 
Management 
12 Yale Road 
Needham, Ma. 



JUDITH M. PATTON 
Math, Sociology 
44 Oakridge Avenue 
Natick, Ma. 01760 



ROSEMARY PAVUK 
Medical Technology 
47 Lincoln Street 
Webster, Ma. 01570 



ANN M. PELRINE 

Nursing 

41 Clark Avenue 

Walpole, Ma. 02081 



SHIRIN PETERSON 
464 Franklin Street 
Mansfield, Ma. 02043 



MARY PETRELLI 
Physical Therapy 
26 Pine Road 
Valhalla, NY 



DENISE C. PEZZULLO 

Nursing 

40 Lawnacre Drive 

Cranston, Rl 02920 



LUCILLE B. PIAZZA 
15 Johnson Road 
Winchester, Ma. 01890 



DIANE PICKMAN 

Psychology 

25 Pondside Drive 

Wethersfield, Ct. 06109 



NANCY B. PRICE 

Management 

40 Curve Street 

West Newton, Ma. 02165 



BAMBI REGIS 
Biology, Nursing 
65 Lincoln House Point 
Swampscott, Ma. 01907 



PAMELA REZNICK 

Sociology 

6 Fir Drive 

Great Neck, NY 11024 



MARABETH ROBBINS 
Management, Finance 
9 MT. Pleasant Street 
Hyde Park, Ma. 02136 



REBECCA ROOP 

Nursing 

709 Barrymore Lane 

Bethlehem, Pa. 18017 



JUDITH A. ROSS 
Communications 
3 Woodbriar Road 
Topsfield, Ma. 01983 



ERICA ROUVALIS 
Physical Therapy 
Terrace Avenue 
Meredith, NH 03253 



155 



KIM A. PERKINS 

Open 

Blue Hill, Me. 04614 



MAUREEN M. QUIRK 

Nutrition 

650 Centre Street 

Newton, Ma. 02158 



CAROLINA RUCCOLO 
Education, Psychology 
36 Bates Street 
Revere, Ma. 02151 



SUSAN C. PERRY 
Communications, Art 
462 West Clinton Street 
New Bedford, Ma. 02740 



VERNESSA RANDALL 
Elementary & Special Ed. 
14 North Court 
New Haven, Ct. 06511 



GAIL RUSSELL 
Physical Therapy 
15 Forest Street 
Holden, Ma. 



PAMELA A. RUSSELL 

Sociology 

47 Cornell Drive 

Plainview, NY 11803 



JANIS H. SEGAL 

Biology 

27 Bay State Road 

Boston, Ma. 02215 



CELESTE E. SIMS 

Education 

4621 South Gramercy Place 

Los Angeles, Ca. 90062 



NANCY E. SABBAG 

Mathematics 

3 Corporal Burns Road 

Cambridge, Ma. 02138 



JAIME SUE SHAPIRO 

Art 

44 Lincoln Circle 

Swampscott, Ma. 01907 



AMY B. SLONIM 

Nutrition 

3342 Rose Lane 

Falls Church, Va. 22042 



MARY ANN SADOWSKI 
Physical Therapy 
25 Howell Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 02125 



MARGARET SHEEDY 
Math, Economics 
31 Oakridge Street 
Mattapan, Ma. 02126 



AUTHURINE SMITH 
Psychology, Sociology 
990-F New Town Circle SE 
Atlanta, Ga. 30315 



156 



LOIS SANDIFORD 
30 Pilgrim Road 
Boston, Ma. 



SUSAN M. SCHATZ 

Nursing 

139 Bedford Street 

Lexington, Ma. 02173 



JANE MARIS SHERMAN 

Nursing 

13 Cluff Road 

Salem, NH 03079 

HOLLY J. SHOOSHANIAN 

Nursing 

105 Hickory Road 

Weston, Ma. 02193 



LINDA M. SMITH 
Communications 
100 School Street 
Arlington, Ma. 02174 



PAMELA L. SNEED 

Nursing 

146 Union Street 

Everett, Ma. 02149 



VIRGINIA A. SCHMITT 
American Studies 
235 Commonwealth Avenue 
Boston, Ma. 02116 



WENDY SHORE 
Nursing, Management 
28 Gale Road 
Belmont, Ma. 02178 



ANN SOROSKY 
15 Shetland Road 
East Brunswick, NJ 



ANDREA SCHOENING 

Psychology 

15 Scotfield Road #14 

Allston, Ma. 02134 



MICHELLE A. SHUSTER 
Psychology, Spceial Ed. 
191 Plymouth Street 
New Bedford, Ma. 02740 



DEBRA STERNS 

Management 

55 Johnson Heights 

Waterville, Me. 04901 



PAMELA SEAVEY 
English, History 
14 Roosevelt Street 
South Portland, Me. 04106 



LYNNE C. SIMMONS 
Physical Therapy 
54 State Street 
Westerly, Rl 02891 



SUSAN K. STETSON 

Chemistry 

33 Kenwood Terrace 

Springfield, Ma. 01108 



GAYLE R. STONE 
Psychology, Government 
203 Eliot Street 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 02167 



JUSTINE C. STRUNGIS 

Biology 

118 Vassall Street 

Quincy, Ma. 02170 



SUSAN TANG 

Communications, Public Relations 

Coral Court A3, 2/F 

122 Tin Hau Temple Rd., Hong 

Kong 



SUSAN ELLEN TAUBER 
Retail Management 
Santa Rosawes 100A 
Curacao Netherlands Antilles 



JAYNE TRIBER 
Communications, Music 
110 Mountain Avenue 
Revere, Ma. 02151 



CLAIRE A. UNDERWOOD 

Nursing 

65 Exeter Street 

Lawrence, Ma. 01843 



CATHERINE A. SULLIVAN 
Physical Therapy 
3061 Boston Post Road 
Guilford, Ct. 



KATHLEEN M. SULLIVAN 
Communications, Management 
859 Squirrel Hill Drive 
Youngstown, Oh. 44512 



KAREN B. SUSSMAN 

Psychology 

4 Janice Terrace 

Clifton, NJ 07013 



JUDY ELIZABETH TAFT 
16 Moore Road 
Sudbury, Ma. 01776 



BARBARA A. TAYNE 
Medical Technology, Biology 
24 Newton Avenue 
Braintree, Ma. 02184 



LOIS TEPPER 

Economics 

56 Highcrest Road 

Fall River, Ma. 02720 



DENISE THOMAS 

Nutrition 

275 Brookline Avenue 

Boston, Ma. 02215 



JACQUELYN A. THOMPSON 
100 Wamsutta Road 
Attleboro, Ma. 02703 



IRENE VAFIDES 
Math, Chemistry 
65 Park Avenue 
Hull, Ma. 02045 



SUSAN M. VAN GEMERT 

Education 

641 West Roxbury Parkway 

West Roxbury, Ma. 02132 



CARMEN VINALES 
346 E 156 St. APT. 7-G 
Bronx, NY 10451 



ROBERTA A. VISCONTI 

Biology 

44 Emmons Street 

Milford, Ma. 01757 



157 



KAREN TAGERMAN 

Education 

2 Ellsworth Avenue 

Cambridge, Ma. 02138 



CYNA A. TOBIAS 
19 Dogwood Lane 
West Hartford, Ct. 06117 



EVELYN WAI 

Advertising, Public Relations 
7A Tung Shan Terrace 
Hong Kong 



BENG IM TAN 
Music, Special Ed. 
21 Kim Bian Aik Road 
Penanage Malaysia 



VIVIAN TOLES 
Psychology, Management 
49 Juniper Street 
Roxbury, Ma. 02119 



RUTH ANN WALSH 

Nursing 

10 Madison Avenue 

Cambridge, Ma. 02140 



PAMELA G. WARD 
Management, Finance 
53 Mason Street 
South Weymouth, Ma. 02190 



CHARLOTTE E. WILSON 
Communications, Graphics 
24 Lyme Street 
Windsor, Ct. 06095 



SUSAN YAUNEY 
English, Communications 
114 West Main Street 
St. Johnsville, NY 13452 



KATHRYN P. WASSETH 

Education 

33 Two Ponds Road 

Falmouth, Ma. 02540 



KAREN WILSON 
Communications, Advertising 
66 Ely Drive 
Fayetteville, NY 13066 



MALLORY C. YEARLEY 
Communications 
56 Concord Avenue 
Cambridge, Ma. 02138 



158 



WENDY S. WEIDIG 
Psychology 
Ann Drive 
Bethany, Ct. 06525 



MERRI L. WEINBERG 
34 North Ash Street 
Brockton, Ma. 02001 



ELLEN E. WESTBROOK 

English 

40 Gartland Street 

Jamaica Plain, Ma. 



GAIL WESTGATE 
Management, Education 
84 Saratoga Heights 
Binghamton, NY 13903 



AUDRA WINSTON 
Communications 
1332 Jefferson Street 
Hollywood, Fl. 33020 



BETH A. WITTCOFF 

Education 

10 Sumac Lane 

St. Louis, Mo. 63124 



PATRICIA WOO 
Physical Therapy 
41A Village Court 
Boston, Ma. 02118 



GWENDOLYN LOUISE WOODARD 
872 Mass Ave. #801 
Cambridge, Ma. 02139 



CAROL YEE 
Management 
41 Undine Road 
Brighton, Ma. 02135 



KAREN YOUNG-THOMAS 
959 Walnut Street 
Roselle, NJ 07203 



DENISE YUU 

Management 

40 Springvale Avenue 

Lynn, Ma. 01904 



JEAN ZUMAN 
Nursing 



WENDY L. WHITTIER 

Education 

31 Hawley Road 

Melrose, Ma. 02176 



CATERINE A. WORRALL 

Education 

420 West Mermaid Lane 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19118 



LINDA WILKEN 
Physical Therapy 
159 Kent Street 
Brookline, Ma. 02146 



HELEN M.J. WU 
Communications, Art 
2537 Justin Lane 
Wilmington, De. 19810 



IS IT 

TRUE 

THAT 

PRIDE 

IS 

ONE OF 




THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS ? 



■D 
CO 

■ M^M 

■ «■■§ 

"D 


O 









6 



EDITORS 

Beth McLaughlin 
Belle Florek 



SENIOR SECTION 
Irene Vafides 
Mary Delia Penna 
Joyce Dragoff 
Marie Conlon 



SPECIAL THANKS TO . . . 
Dick Swiech for his help 

and understanding 
Steve Ollove and 
Peter Colton 

of Stevens Studios for all 

their help 
Boris Color Labs 
Simmons College Archives 
Office of Public Information 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Kim Dengler 
Kim Erickson 
Sarah Brown 
Linda Smith 
Amy Handler 
Patricia McCarthy 
Annie McAuliffe 
Debbie LaCava 
Marcia Harding 



FACULTY SECTION 
Marion Miller 
Melanie Guzelian 
Pat Bieler 



DEDICATED TO OUR STAFF 
See the happy moron, 
He doesn't give a damn! 
I wish I were a moron — 
My God! Perhaps I am! 
— anonymous — 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Peggy Sheedy 



COVER DESIGN AND 
DIVIDER SHEETS 
Eva Chan 



ARTWORK 
Mimi Kelley 



ESSAY 
Jayne Triber 



COPY 

Debbie Carlson 



(*from the Webster's New School and Office Dictionary)